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chloroplast : a plastid that contains chlorophyll and is the site of photosynthesis (Chloroplast, 2015) [1]blank.gifWebster
Chloroplasts are organelles found in plant cells and other eukaryotic organisms that conduct photosynthesis. Chloroplasts capture light energy to conserve free energy in the form of ATP and reduce NADP to NADPH through a complex set of processes called photosynthesis. Chloroplasts are green because they contain the pigment chlorophyll. The word chloroplast (χλωροπλάστης) is derived from the Greek words chloros, which means green, and plastis, which means "the one who forms". Chloroplasts are members of a class of organelles known as plastids. (Chloroplast, 2015) [2]blank.gif Wikipedia
photosynthesis : synthesis of chemical compounds with the aid of radiant energy and especially light; especially : formation of carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and a source of hydrogen (as water) in the chlorophyll-containing tissues of plants exposed to light (Photosynthesis, 2015) [3]blank.gifWebster blank.gif
Photosynthesis is a chemical process that converts carbon dioxide into organic compounds, especially sugars, using the energy from sunlight. Photosynthesis occurs in plants, algae, and many species of bacteria, but not in archaea. Photosynthetic organisms are called photoautotrophs, since they can create their own food. In plants, algae, and cyanobacteria, photosynthesis uses carbon dioxide and water, releasing oxygen as a waste product. Photosynthesis is vital for all aerobic life on Earth. In addition to maintaining normal levels of oxygen in the atmosphere, photosynthesis is the source of energy for nearly all life on earth, either directly, through primary production, or indirectly, as the ultimate source of the energy in their food, the exceptions being chemoautotrophs that live in rocks or around deep sea hydrothermal vents. The rate of energy capture by photosynthesis is immense, approximately 100 terawatts, which is about six times larger than the power consumption of human civilization. As well as energy, photosynthesis is also the source of the carbon in all the organic compounds within organisms' bodies. (Photosynthesis, 2015) [4]blank.gif Wikipedia

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blank.gifmicroorganismblank.gif virus blank.gif archaea blank.gif prokaryote (bacteria) blank.gif mitochondria, chlorophlast
blank.gifeukaryote blank.gifplant algae blank.gifnot plant or animal protist, fungi, lichen blank.gifanimal protozoa, amoeba

blank.gifmicroscope blank.gif Linnaean system blank.gifmorphologyblank.gifanatomyblank.gifphysiology blank.gif cellblank.gifgeneblank.gifevolutionblank.giffossil

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Learn Biology: Cells—Chloroplasts


Chloroplast


Chloroplasts in close-up


Chloroplasts, John W. Kimball's Biology Pages

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Bill Nye The Science Guy - Chloroplasts


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chloroplast - Google News


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Editor Mary E. Hopper
Contributor Neil R. Carlson


© Cosma creator mehopper editor mehopper revised 7/14/2016 v.1.5




  1. ^ Chloroplast. (2015). In Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary (11th ed.). Retrieved July 11, 2015, from http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/chloroplast
  2. ^ Chloroplast. (2015). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved July 11, 2015, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chloroplast
  3. ^ Photosynthesis. (2015). In Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary (11th ed.). Retrieved July 11, 2015, from http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/Photosynthesis
  4. ^ Photosynthesis. (2015). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved July 11, 2015, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photosynthesis